Abducted in Japan: One Father’s Story

Posted on February 16, 2011. Filed under: Child Abduction, Video | Tags: |

Navy Cdr. Paul Toland first spotted his future wife at a running club while he was stationed in Japan. Too shy to talk to her at first, he said he eventually worked up enough nerve to ask her out using a Japanese-English translator.

It was a gesture, he says, that would lead to years of happy marriage and the birth of their daughter, Erika.

By the time Erika was born in 2002, Toland and his wife Etsuko had been married for seven years. She became a U.S. citizen shortly after in preparation for the family’s eventual move back to the United States.

But when Erika was less than a year old, Etsuko, who Toland said had became increasingly unhappy, took Erika from their Navy housing and cut off all contact.

“I was at work one day and I got a phone call from my neighbors saying ‘Are you moving back to the States? … And I said what are you talking about,’” Toland said. “And they said ‘Well, there’s a moving van outside your house.’ When I got home my wife and my daughter and all our stuff was gone.”

Etsuko committed suicide four years later and her mother, Akiko Futagi immediately took guardianship of Erika. Toland, Erika’s sole surviving parent, has never been allowed to spend time with his daughter.

ABC News found Futagi and Erika in northern Tokyo. Futagi accused Toland of being a dead-beat feather who has never paid her for raising his daughter.

“He doesn’t pay anything to bring her up,” Futagi said. When asked if she would let Toland see Erika, her response was quick. “No,” she said.

Toland said he has tried to put money into a bank account for his daughter, but Futagi rejected his lawyer’s offer.

“The State Department has tried to visit with my daughter a number of times and have been rejected,” Toland said. “They even asked the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs to try to visit with my daughter and they were rejected. And once again they came back and said, ‘Sorry, we tried there’s nothing we can do.’”

Paul Toland video

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