Archive for August 13th, 2013

Leading Women for Shared Parenting

Posted on August 13, 2013. Filed under: Child Custody and Visitation | Tags: , , , , |

Leading Women for Shared Parenting was founded to dispel the widespread myth that it is only – or even mainly – disgruntled fathers with limited access to their children who promote equal shared parenting as the default model for separating parents.

That is simply not the truth.

Polls in the United States, Canada and other western countries consistently demonstrate overwhelming support in the general population for equally shared parenting. Both fair-minded men and women across all social and cultural lines understand that mothers and fathers are equally important in the lives of their children.

For some years a number of prominent women in media and politics have been championing this issue in the public forum of ideas and in policy-making circles. Eventually they sought a common platform from which they could bring their support for equal shared parenting to effective attention and positive legislative action.

Thus LW4SP came into being, with more than 150 influential women lending their names in support of the equal shared parenting principle.

LW4SP is made of up Leading Woman from all walks of life including prominent authors, activists, researchers, academics, advocates, domestic violence experts, columnists, therapists, legislators, attorneys, PTA Presidents and more. Most importantly however, LW4SP has a highly engaged membership, comprised of over two-thirds Women, who are determined to change Family Law in the most crucial way; to benefit the well-being of Children. Our organization is assisted by a group of passionate volunteers whose tireless efforts make all the difference.

Click on the link below to listen to Jill Egizii (of Family Matters) talk with 4 women who are involved with Leading Women for Shared Parenting (LW4SP). These 4 women share their stories about why they got involved with LW4SP.

leading-women-for-shared-parenting

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Human Rights Counseling Offices in Japan

Posted on August 13, 2013. Filed under: Human Rights | Tags: , , , |

Information is in both Japanese and English

外国人のための人権相談所を利用される方は,受付日時・通訳言語を確認の上,下記の「相談場所」にお越しいただくか,お電話ください。
なお,人権相談一般に関するお問い合わせは,下記「お問い合わせ先」の各法務局・地方法務局までお願いいたします(受付日時 平日 午前8時30分~午後5時15分)。

局名 相談場所 受付日時 通訳言語 お問い合わせ先
東京 東京法務局内人権相談室
千代田区九段南1-1-15
九段第2合同庁舎12階
03(5213)1372
毎週 月
13:30 ~ 16:00
中国語 東京法務局
人権擁護部
03(5213)1372
毎週 火・木
13:30 ~ 16:00
英語
ドイツ語
大阪 大阪法務局内人権相談室
大阪市中央区谷町2-1-17
大阪第2法務合同庁舎
06(6942)9496
毎月 第1,第3水
13:00 ~ 16:00
英語 大阪法務局
人権擁護部
06(6942)9496
毎週 水
13:00 ~ 16:00
中国語
神戸 神戸地方法務局内人権相談室
神戸市中央区波止場町1-1
078(393)0600
毎月 第2水
13:00 ~ 17:00
英語 神戸地方法務局
人権擁護課
078(393)0600
毎月 第4水
13:00 ~ 17:00
中国語
名古屋 名古屋法務局内人権相談室
名古屋市中区三の丸2-2-1
052(952)8111(代)
毎月 第2火
13:00 ~ 16:00
英語
ポルトガル語
名古屋法務局
人権擁護部
052(952)8111
広島 広島法務局内人権相談室
広島市中区上八丁堀6-30
082(228)5792
月曜日~金曜日
(祝日,年末年始を除く)
8:30 ~17:15
(予約制)
英語
ポルトガル語
スペイン語
タガログ語
広島法務局
人権擁護部
082(228)5792
福岡 アクロス福岡3階こくさいひろば
福岡市中央区天神1-1-1
092(725)9200
毎月 第2土
13:00 ~ 16:00
英語 福岡法務局
人権擁護部
092(832)4311
高松 アイパル香川(香川国際交流会館)
国際交流フロア
高松市番町1-11-63
087(837)5908
毎月 第3金
13:00 ~ 15:00
(予約制)
英語
中国語
ハングル
スペイン語
ポルトガル語
高松法務局
人権擁護部
087(815)5311
松山 愛媛県国際交流センター
松山市道後一万1-1
089(917)5678
毎月 第4木
13:30 ~ 15:30
英語 松山地方法務局
人権擁護課
089(932)0888

Human Rights Counseling Offices for Foreigners

Please contact the Offices according to your language in person or by telephone in business hours for counseling to Human Rights Counseling Offices for Foreigners.

Offices Business Hours Language
TOKYO Tokyo Legal Affairs Bureau
1-1-15 Kudanminami Chiyoda-ku
Tel 03 – 5213 – 1372
Monday
13:30 ~ 16:00
Chinese
Tuesday , Thursday
13:30 ~ 16:00
English
German
OSAKA Osaka Legal Affairs Bureau
2-1-17 Tani-machi Chuo-ku Osaka-shi
Tel 06 – 6942 – 9496
1st and 3rd Wednesday
13:00 ~ 16:00
English
Wednesday
13:00 ~ 16:00
Chinese
KOBE Kobe District Legal Affairs Bureau
1-1 Hatoba-cho Chuo-ku Kobe-shi
Tel 078 – 393 – 0600
2nd Wednesday
13:00 ~ 17:00
English
4th Wednesday
13:00 ~ 17:00
Chinese
NAGOYA Nagoya Legal Affairs Bureau
2-2-1 Sannomaru Naka-ku Nagoya-shi
Tel 052 – 952 – 8111
2nd Tuesday
13:00 ~ 16:00
English
Portuguese
HIROSHIMA Hiroshima Legal Affairs Bureau
6-30 Kamihacchobori Naka-ku Hiroshima-shi
Tel 082 – 228 – 5792
From Monday to Friday
(Excluding public holidays,
the year-end and New Year holidays)
8:30 ~ 17:15
(Reserve in advance)
English
Portuguese
Spanish
Tagalog
FUKUOKA KOKUSAI HIROBA ACROS Fukuoka 3rd Floor
1-1-1 Tenjin Chuo-ku Fukuoka-shi
Tel 092 – 725 – 9200
2nd Saturday
13:00 ~ 16:00
English
TAKAMATSU Kagawa International Exchange Center
( I – pal Kagawa )
1-11-63 Ban-cho Takamatsu-shi
Tel 087 – 837 – 5908
3rd Friday
13:00 ~ 15:00
( Reserve in advance)
English
Chinese
Korean
Spanish
Portuguese
MATSUYAMA Ehime Prefectural International Center(EPIC)
1-1 Dougoichiman Matsuyama-shi
Tel 089 – 917 – 5678
4th Thursday
13:30 ~ 15:30
English
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Manual issued for Hague treaty child retrievals

Posted on August 13, 2013. Filed under: Hague Convention | Tags: , , |

BY MAGDALENA OSUMI– Japan Times

The Supreme Court has issued a case-by-case manual for court-appointed administrators on how to retrieve children in parental cross-border abduction cases under the Hague Convention, minimizing the use of force to avoid traumatizing the kids, the court’s spokesman said.

The manual, issued June 14, outlines measures the administrators who would be assigned the task of returning children to their place of habitual residence, even by force, should take as Japan considers joining the Hague Convention by the end of next March, the spokesman said Friday.

It says the administrators “should take utmost consideration” to protect the interests of the child.

The 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction mandates procedures for a child abducted by one parent of a failed marriage to be swiftly returned to its country of habitual residence. The convention only applies to children under the age of 16.

The nation has come under fire in recent years over cases in which Japanese parents in estranged marriages overseas have brought children to Japan in defiance of divorce court custody or visitation rights rulings abroad.

Often, the estranged Japanese spouse claims to have fled from an abusive relationship. But the removal of a child from its country of habitual residence has been deemed a violation of that nation’s law, and the abducting parent a fugitive.

Under legislation that cleared the Diet in May, a court-designated officer can forcibly retrieve a child abducted or retained by a parent residing in Japan in defiance of an overseas custody ruling and who refuses to hand over the child.

The manual calls for the officer to attempt to take custody of the child at the home of the abducting parent, in an environment where privacy is thus protected and the child feels safe. Taking a child away in a public place, such as a day care center or on a street, may lead to “unpredictable situations” and traumatize the child, it said.

If the child cries or refuses to be returned to the other parent, the officer should not use force, according to the manual.

Should an officer visit a home to retrieve a child and is told it is not present, the child’s name should be called out and a check made on the presence of the child’s belongings, the manual says.

The officer is authorized to forcibly enter and search a home if there are indications the child is inside.

In the case of an infant, the manual allows the officer, with the parent’s consent, to remove it from the crib. But the officer must not try to forcibly take custody of an infant if the parent is hugging it tightly to prevent such action.

The manual, issued by the Supreme Court’s Civil Affairs Bureau, is based on meetings involving judges and other court officials nationwide in January and February. The gatherings covered past cases of failed domestic marriages where one parent fled with a child from the country of habitual residence without the consent of the other parent.

Court-designated officers have retrieved children in those cases but have not had specific manuals or regulations to follow. The latest document urges such officers in domestic cases to follow its instructions to avoid harming the child in any way.

In past divorce custody cases in Japan, officers apparently tried to retrieve children in public places, resulting in shouting matches.

Fiscal 2010 saw 120 domestic cases processed in which a parent demanded the forcible return of an offspring. The figure was 133 in fiscal 2011 and 131 in fiscal 2012.

Japan is the only Group of Eight member yet to accede to the Hague Convention. If it becomes a signatory, the cases will be handled by a family court in Tokyo or Osaka.

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