Texas girl taken by mom 12 years ago rescued in Mexico

Posted on October 7, 2014. Filed under: Child Abduction | Tags: , |

Sabrina Allen, who was abducted in 2002 in Texas at age 4 by her mother, has been rescued near Mexico City and returned to the United States, the FBI said Wednesday.

Sabrina, now 17, was found Tuesday and her 44-year-old mother, Dara Llorens, was arrested during a stealth operation conducted by the Mexican Federal Authority, FBI and U.S. Marshals in Estafeta Tlaxcala, about 60 miles southeast of Mexico City.

Sabrina was undergoing medical evaluation at an undisclosed location and was not immediately reunited with her father, Greg Allen, who has been remarried for 10 years and has young children with his new wife.

“She doesn’t want to see me, she doesn’t want to see any of my family, so we are respecting those wishes,” he told reporters at a news conference in Austin. He said his ex-wife had manipulated their daughter and turned her against him.

Sabrina’s return marked the emotional end of a 12-year disappearance after Llorens allegedly defied a court-approved custody agreement and fled the country during an outing with her daughter.

“You know I’ve spent a lot of time traveling in Mexico and had a lot of help (from Mexican authorities); what happened is, we got lucky,” Allen said. “She’s home.”

“I understand she’s been subjected to intense parental alienation,” he added. “We have a long road ahead of us.”

He said that she was receiving mental health counseling and that “we really don’t have a timetable” for when they would be reunited.

When they are, “I’m going to ask her if I can give her a hug,” he said tearfully. “She’s in pretty bad shape is my understanding. I just pray for healing.”

“We’re eager to have her home as soon as possible, and will slowly introduce her to family members and do what we can,” he added.

Llorens was wanted on a federal warrant on charges of aggravated kidnapping, interference with child custody, and unlawful flight to avoid prosecution. She was booked into Travis County Jail on charges of “intentionally and knowingly abducting the child by restraining her so as to interfere substantially with her liberty, by moving her from one place to another.” Bond was set at $300,000.

Llorens had been under surveillance for about two weeks by an informant working for investigators, according to Philip Klein, with KIC Investigations.

The pair was spotted once in Mexico in 2003 but eluded capture. Both apparently had dyed their hair and were using false names.

Authorities in the joint task force in Mexico moved in at 11:32 a.m. Tuesday. One Mexican federal officer sustained a minor injury during a struggle with Llorens, according to Klein.

The FBI said it had pursued hundreds of tips and leads over the years worldwide and that Llorens had narrowly avoided capture more than once by assuming new identities and moving frequently.

“Whether it’s 12 years, one month or two years, we don’t quit and we won’t stop,” FBI Agent Dan Powers told reporters.

Sabrina had been listed as missing by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Llorens had disappeared to Mexico with the girl at the end of a six-month period of court-supervised visitation, according to the website FindSabrina.org.

The FBI said that on April 19, 2002, Llorens took her daughter for a scheduled weekend visit under the custody agreement. She failed to return Sabrina to Allen, her primary guardian, by 6 p.m. on April 21.

Allen told KVUE-TV that his former wife had threatened to take Sabrina away before they vanished. The case was featured twice on America’s Most Wanted.

Contributing: KVUE-TV in Austin

Follow Doug Stanglin on Twitter: @dstanglin

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Documentary about parental abduction by Bryan McGlothin

Posted on November 20, 2012. Filed under: Child Abduction, Divorce | Tags: , , , , , , |

Bryan McGlothin is working on a documentary about parental abduction. Bryan was abducted by his father when he was 2 years. His father moved around to prevent Bryan’s mother from finding him. Bryan was told (by his father) that his mother did not love him and did not want to be in his life. When Bryan became an adult and escaped his father’s grip he began searching for his mothers grave, since his father told him that his mother had died. Instead of finding his mother’s grave, he found his mother. But it was not the fairy tale story that everyone hopes for. You can read his book or listen to his interview on Family Matters Blog Talk Radio with Jill Egizii the president of Parental Alienation Awareness Organization. Bryan’s book, “Have You Seen My Mother: A True Story of Parental Kidnap.”, is a gut wrenching.  Bryan’s documentary will raise awareness about a subject that has been off the radar for too long. Please think about donating to this cause. You can find more information at:

http://www.indiegogo.com/preventparentalkidnap

http://www.preventparentalkidnap.org/index.html

About the Documentary
It’s estimated about 250,000 children are abducted by a parent or family member every year in the United States alone. Parental abduction is also a major international problem.
As these children are used a pawns in toxic relationships, the abuse they endure is ignored. Abuse, many of us have to deal with for many years, well into adulthood…
We examine this abuse from the child’s point-of-view by interviewing adult survivors of this abuse.
We are also looking to film in Canada, Australia and the UK. Parental abduction to Japan is one of the largest issues in international parental abduction.

Where the Money Goes
As you can see, we need several thousand to cover travel expenses. With the $30,000.00 we also expect to be able to accomplish preliminary editing (post production), but we are working on grants to pay for the final editing. Anything we can raise over our goal will help us complete the documentary, pay for marketing, etc. and any extra money goes to the non-profit Prevent Parental Kidnap, Inc.

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French father commits suicide because he can’t see his child

Posted on February 1, 2011. Filed under: Child Custody and Visitation, Divorce, France, Hague Convention, Suicide | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

The life and career of Arnaud Simon once could have exemplified the excellent relationship between Japan and France. A young French historian teaching in Tokyo, Simon was preparing a thesis on the history of thought during the Edo Period. He was married to a Japanese woman. They had one son.

But on Nov. 20, Arnaud Simon took his own life. He hanged himself. He did not need to leave an explanatory note; his closest friends knew he had lost the appetite for living because his wife would not allow Simon to see his son after their marriage broke up. Simon apparently tried on multiple occasions to take his boy home from school, but the police blocked the young father each time.

“The lawyers he met were trying to appease him, not help him,” one of his former colleagues remembers.

Another Frenchman in the same situation, Christophe Guillermin, committed suicide in June. These two deaths are terrible reminders of the hell some foreign parents inhabit in Japan – and because of Japan. When a couple separates here, custody of any children is traditionally awarded to the mother. After that, the children rarely have contact with the “other side”; they are supposed to delete the losing parent from their lives.

There is no tradition of visitation rights in Japan, and even when those rights are granted, the victory generally comes at the end of a long and costly judicial battle fought in Japanese courts. The visitation rights given are also typically very limited – sometimes just a couple of hours per month. Worse yet, the mother ultimately decides whether she wants to abide by the agreement. The police will not intervene if she refuses, on the grounds that this is a private matter. While there are exceptions, Japanese fathers seem to have basically accepted this practice. For foreign fathers, it is almost universally impossible and unbearable.

France is particularly touched by these tragedies. There have been many unions between Japanese women and French men, and many breakups. Simon’s death was shocking enough to the French community for the French ambassador to issue a stern and in many ways personal press release afterward: “Mr. Simon recently told the Consulate of the hardships he endured to meet his son, and it is most probable that to be cut off from his son was one of the main reasons (for his suicide). This reminds us, if necessary, of the pain of the 32 French fathers and of the 200 other (foreign cases involving) fathers known to foreign consulates as deprived of their parental rights.”
A Killing Separation

During a recent trip related to this subject in Japan, French judge and legal expert Mahrez Abassi said: “Japan has not ratified the Hague Convention on civil aspects of international children’s abductions. There is no bilateral convention on this topic, and our judicial decisions are not recognized in Japan.” Tokyo is in a precarious position on this issue, since one of the main topics of Japan’s diplomacy is the case of Japanese nationals abducted by North Korea, for which Japan requires international solidarity.

Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs seems preoccupied by the problem, which only promises to grow because of the constant rise of international divorces in Japan – now at 6 percent – and of Japanese-foreign births (20,000). Various diplomatic delegations have visited Japan to discuss the issue. France and Japan set up a “consulting committee on the child at the center of a parental conflict” in December 2009. But the National Police Agency, the Justice Ministry, and Japanese civil society in general care little about the issue.

“There is no system better than another for the child after a breakup,” says a foreign psychiatrist who has followed cases of foreign fathers that have lost access to their children in Japan. “The French and American systems have deep flaws as well. But it is simply unbearable for a French father, for example, to be unable to meet his child.”

A French lawyer based in Tokyo, adds: “The principle of joint custody as it is known in France does not exist in Japan. To implement such a principle here, we would have to amend the Civil Code, which is very hard for family law matters in this country. If this change is enacted, the police should then compel Japanese families to hand over the ‘disputed’ child to the foreign father. This seems pretty hard to achieve.” ❶

Regis Arnaud is the Japan correspondent of leading French daily Le Figaro and has been covering Japan since 1995. He is also a movie producer. His next project, called CUT, laments the decline of the Japanese movie industry.

A killing separation By: Regis Arnaud

Number 1 Shimbun, December 16, 2010

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Interview (video) with Doshisha University Law Professor

Posted on January 25, 2011. Filed under: Child Abduction, Child Custody and Visitation, Japanese Family Law, Video | Tags: , , , , |

Colin Jones is a law professor at Doshisha University in Kyoto. He has studied Japanese Family Law, Japanese Courts, Child Custody, Divorce, and Parental Abduction for the last 6 years. He did an interview in the summer of 2009 about Japanese Family Courts and why they do what they do. The interview can be found on youtube. Colin is very knowledgeable and he compares Japanese Family Law and California Family Law at times. If you want to learn more about the Family Court System in Japan please watch the 50 minute interview. (It is a five part series each being 10 minutes).

Part I

Part II

Part III

Part IV

Part V

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Joint Custody/Parental Alienation Demo and Symposium

Posted on January 20, 2011. Filed under: Child Abduction, Child Custody and Visitation, Japanese Family Law, Parental Alienation Syndrome, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

On Saturday July 31st, (“中部・共同親権法制化運動の会”)”Chubu Joint Custody Association for the legislation of joint nurture” sponsored a demo in Nagoya followed by a symposium related to Parental Abduction, Joint Custody, and Parental Alienation. Five fathers spoke at the symposium after the demo. Goto-sensei was the keynote speaker at the symposium. NHK and the Chunichi shimbun were at the symposium and plan to do stories on the issue.

Goto-sensei had several interesting points. She said, there are not many lawyers in Japan that are experienced and willing to fight the unjust Japanese Court system. Goto-sensei talked about a case that she worked on for 3 years. She represented the father and after a 3 year battle custody was awarded to him but transferring physical custody to the father was a problem. The court tried to assist with this two different times but each time it failed. After the second failure the court suggested that Goto and the father give up. Hence, as most of us know, the court has no real power.

Goto said things use to be different 30 years ago. Men often got custody but sometime in the 1990′s a feminist movement took place and women suddenly started gaining power especially in custody cases.

Goto also said, if you are a good person and follow the Japanese way your chances of being abused by the system are great. Goto suggested you fight in court that way judges and courts will know there is a problem. If you don’t try and fight you will never win. “Fight the system” was her biggest message of the day. But, in the same breath Goto-sensei said there are only 5 aggressive lawyers in Japan who are willing to fight the system. She said the other lawyers are weak or inexperienced and don’t want to cause trouble. So if you read between the lines, it is almost impossible to hire an aggressive lawyer who will fight for the best interests of the child.

If you have time watch the short video below.

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Abducted Child Found after 26 Years

Posted on January 20, 2011. Filed under: Child Abduction, Parental Alienation Syndrome | Tags: , , , |

Despite the harm Nancy Fiedler inflicted on her daughter and her ex-husband and his family, I predict her punishment will not fit the crime. If this were a “stranger” abduction, there is no doubt of severe retribution, however, the irony is that the true victim, Eva, will likely support and defend her mother.

According to Georgialee Lang (lawyer), there is no reason to believe that Nancy Fiedler will discontinue her accusations of abuse against Greg Fiedler after living a large part of her life based on this theme. In Ms. Lang’s experience, women like Nancy Fiedler rarely have insight into their destructive behavior. She likely casts herself in the role of heroine, after all, she saved her daughter.

To read the full article click on the link. Lawdiva blog

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